All Future

We, Our, Us

Artist(s):

Susan Silton’s We, Our, Us expands on her series investigating the historical use of stripes as social and cultural signifiers, and is motivated by the idea of transit stations as shared public spaces.

Urban Excavation: Ancestors, Avatars, Bodhisattvas, Buddhas, Casts, Copies, Deities, Figures, Funerary Objects, Gods, Guardians, Mermaids, Metaphors, Mothers, Possessions, Sages, Spirits, Symbols, and Other Objects

Artist(s):

Inspired by the idea of transporting the body and mind, and by the station as an excavation site, Ken Gonzales-Day‘s glass-tile mural for the north and south concourse level walls aims to transport transit customers across time and place by immersing them in an environment where images of objects—spanning many cultures, continents and eras—mined from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s permanent collection are reproduced at an enormous scale.

The Ancient Forest

Artist(s):

The artwork for Metro’s Center Project facility will be an architecturally integrated piece by Jacob Hashimoto. This site-specific installation is silkscreened onto the exterior metal panels. The artwork patterns are inspired by the cellular structure of the bristlecone pine, one of the oldest known living organisms and native to California.

Night/Quartz

Artist(s):

Soo Kim’s artwork concept for the station platform cuts and collages her photographs of the dense, urban topography along the Wilshire corridor with images she has captured throughout the world.

Miracle of La Brea

Artist(s):

Mark Dean Veca’s artwork concept for the station platform draws from the art deco details of the nearby Wilshire Tower building and the past and present geology of the Miracle Mile neighborhood through stylistic references to barley fields and tar.

Mining the Archive: S. Charles Lee, Architect

Artist(s):

Todd Gray’s artwork concept for the station’s glass entrance plaza and escalator landing walls juxtaposes archival architectural drawings by S. Charles Lee and historic photographs of the nearby Saban Theatre (formerly the Fox Wilshire Theatre) with a multicultural selection of iconic textile patterns.

Infinite Landscape: Los Ángeles Para Siempre

Artist(s):

Inspired by the geometric details of the art deco architecture along the Wilshire corridor and in greater Los Angeles, Eamon Ore-Giron’s artwork concept for the glass entrance pavilion and escalator landing walls of this station references the past while looking toward the rapidly changing future of Los Angeles’s streetscape.

Hands and Things

Artist(s):

Karl Haendel’s larger-than-life composition for the glass entrance pavilion and escalator landing walls of this station will provide prompts for transit customers to engage with their surroundings and reflect on their daily experiences.

People Over Profit

Artist(s):

Meleko Mokgosi’s platform level station artwork will recognize everyday people who work in Beverly Hills. The artwork will celebrate both the important work of historic labor leaders who fought for worker’s rights, and contemporary workers

Gathering of the Waters

Artist(s):

Rigo 23’s artwork engages Beverly Hills’ history as Tongva land and a place called “a gathering of waters.” In the artwork, water will be depicted in different stages of stillness and motion, animated as the Metro rider walks by. A waterscape framed by plant life strengthens connectedness to the natural world and history’s slower tempo, while also offering a respite from the hustle and bustle of the commute. Enlarged portraits of indigenous plants represent gifts to Spanish explorer Portola’s expedition by local Tongva representatives, a gesture of welcoming and generosity at the center of Los Angeles’ origin story. This generosity would not be reciprocated by the waves of European arrivals. The Tongva people and their culture were nearly erased by foreign cultural and religious impositions as well as the introduction of diseases to which the locals had no defenses. This project aims to contribute to the reversal of a multi-century long process of erasure, forgetting and replacing.

Untitled

Artist(s):

Sarah Cain’s artwork for the station’s entrance is intended to be a welcoming, oasis of color and design in contrast to the density of metallic high-rise buildings in Century City.

Allegorical Portal to the City Within a City

Artist(s):

Phung Huynh explores the origin story of Century City through her unique approach of urban folklore and community voices. The artwork will include portraits of recognizable actors from the area’s early history as a film studio back lot and renowned architects who built Century City, as well as everyday people who work and own businesses in the area.

Lenticular Americana

Artist(s):

Oscar Magallanes was inspired by Century City’s history in the motion pictures industry. Their design for the station artwork weaves together a narrative of stories told through film and the complex histories of the communities surrounding the future station.

Terra Firma

Artist(s):

Analia Saban is creating a semi-fictional underground world constructed in geologic layers of color and texture. Buried in the layers, riders will find an unexpected montage of objects from symbols of local culture to prehistoric fossils found during Metro’s station excavation.

Untitled

Artist(s):

Moses X Ball’s inspiration for his design of the platform artwork is driven by his experiences growing up in South Central Los Angeles and riding public transit to visit the museums along Wilshire Boulevard at a young age.

Memories

Artist(s):

Karen Hampton’s artwork for the Northeast Entrance draws inspiration from her childhood experiences riding the RTD bus along Wilshire Blvd, examining how travel can broaden one’s access to different cultures.

A Panorama of LA and History of the Pacific Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers

Artist(s):

Sandow Birk’s artwork will depict a panorama of Los Angeles over 150 feet long focusing on the area around the future station and beyond. The scene spans millennia, as prehistoric creatures roam past historic and contemporary buildings such as the Wadsworth Chapel, the oldest building on Wilshire Blvd., the gates to the VA with the National Soldiers Home plaques, and the main hospital at the West LA VA Medical Center that was built in 1977.