All Future

Will Power Allegory

Artist(s):

The 14 colorful panels of Audrey Chan’s Will Power Allegory feature fluid vignettes of people and symbols from Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo, Arts District, Skid Row, Bronzeville, and Gabrielino/Tongva Tribe.

We, Our, Us

Artist(s):

Project Description Susan Silton’s We, Our, Us expands on her series investigating the historical use of stripes as social and cultural signifiers, and is motivated by the idea of transit stations as shared public spaces. The porcelain enamel steel artwork for the station platform will include three prescient messages in English, Korean and Spanish—the predominant languages of the neighborhood—embedded within multicolor-striped fields to explore individuality and diversity while acknowledging our collective human experience. Artist Statement “My projects interrupt—in subtle and more overt ways and through combinations of humor, edginess and subterfuge—the assumptions we make based on our observations.” About the Artist SUSAN SILTON (b. 1956, Los Angeles) is an interdisciplinary visual artist whose practice engages with photography, video, installation, performance, artist’s books, sound and language. Silton’s work takes form in performative and participatory-based projects, photography, video, installation, text/audio works, and print-based projects, and presents in diverse contexts such as public sites, social network platforms, and traditional galleries and institutions. She earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Los Angeles, and studied at Art Center College of Design. Her work has been presented at numerous national and international venues that include the …

Urban Excavation: Ancestors, Avatars, Bodhisattvas, Buddhas, Casts, Copies, Deities, Figures, Funerary Objects, Gods, Guardians, Mermaids, Metaphors, Mothers, Possessions, Sages, Spirits, Symbols, and Other Objects

Artist(s):

Inspired by the idea of transporting the body and mind, and by the station as an excavation site, Ken Gonzales-Day‘s glass-tile mural for the north and south concourse level walls aims to transport transit customers across time and place by immersing them in an environment where images of objects—spanning many cultures, continents and eras—mined from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s permanent collection are reproduced at an enormous scale.

Preliminary sketches of artwork concept, and sketches of proposed elements to build artwork.

Untitled

Artist(s):

This site-specific project will consist of hundreds of small, metal, multicolored components that will be woven, cross stitch-like, into the building’s façade, creating a complex, abstracted landscape that will colorfully weave its way around part of the building.

Untitled

Artist(s):

For her artwork, Andrea Bowers will imbue the glass walls of the station’s entrance pavilion with messages of unity and democracy through her translation of the slogans “El pueblo unido jamás será vencido” (The people united will never be divided) and “By independence we mean the right to self-determination, self-government and freedom.”

Untitled

Artist(s):

Mickalene Thomas’s mosaic was inspired by the quality of light, cultural and visual richness, and iconic structures in the surrounding Leimert Park neighborhood.

Untitled

Artist(s):

Dean Erdmann’s porcelain enamel art panels depict double-exposed photographs of natural elements in Leimert Park interspersed with images of the transit environment.

Talking Drums

Artist(s):

Ingrid Calame collaborated with youth through the RightWay Foundation to create rubbings of the physical environment—from furniture and instruments to architectural elements such as doorways and signs, all found in the neighborhood.

Rise

Artist(s):

Sherin Guirguis’s richly colored artworks reflect the countless individuals who have migrated to the area, many of whom have risen above tremendous obstacles.

Red Car Requiem

Mark Steven Greenfield’s glass mosaic, titled Red Car Requiem, for the station’s concourse will be a sentimental tribute to Los Angeles’s historic Pacific Electric Red Cars, a once iconic fixture in the city.

Only Light, Only Love

Artist(s):

Shinique Smith’s mosaic mural playfully visualizes the cultural richness of South Los Angeles by collaging elements pulled from fashion, pop culture and calligraphy. Honoring the station’s namesake, the artwork also includes a selection of empowering words inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s speeches and autobiography.

Night/Quartz

Artist(s):

Soo Kim’s artwork concept for the station platform cuts and collages her photographs of the dense, urban topography along the Wilshire corridor with images she has captured throughout the world.

Negative Space

Artist(s):

Titled Negative Space (STScI-2015-02), Mungo Thomson’s two murals for this subway platform evolved from a series of artworks in which he digitally inverts astronomical images from the Hubble Space Telescope’s online photographic archive.

Miracle of La Brea

Artist(s):

Mark Dean Veca’s artwork concept for the station platform draws from the art deco details of the nearby Wilshire Tower building and the past and present geology of the Miracle Mile neighborhood through stylistic references to barley fields and tar.

Mining the Archive: S. Charles Lee, Architect

Artist(s):

Todd Gray’s artwork concept for the station’s glass entrance plaza and escalator landing walls juxtaposes archival architectural drawings by S. Charles Lee and historic photographs of the nearby Saban Theatre (formerly the Fox Wilshire Theatre) with a multicultural selection of iconic textile patterns.

Migrations

With particular emphasis on the often-overlooked migrations of Black Americans, Clarence Williams’s deeply personal artwork, Migrations, for the platform of this downtown station pays tribute to the area’s legacy as a place where scores of migrants first made their way to Los Angeles.

Layered Histories

Artist(s):

Jaime Scholnick’s frieze-like collages are based on hundreds of studies and more than 11,800 photographs of the surrounding neighborhood. Progressing from dawn to night, the artist spent many hours documenting the area around the station and talking to local residents about their visions for the artwork.

Inglewood CA Series: Metro collection 1–10

Artist(s):

Kim Schoenstadt’s murals portray hybrid structures based on existing and historical buildings from the surrounding Inglewood neighborhood, including the Broadway Federal Bank, Centinela Adobe, Crozier Middle School, Jet Car Wash, Los Angeles International Airport Theme Building and Randy’s Donuts, to name a few.